Luxembourg Diary – A Country With All Things Elegant

Tucked between Belgium, France and Germany is the gorgeous little European nation of Luxembourg. Luxembourg means ‘Lucilinburhc’ or little fortress. Luxembourg is ONE of the richest countries in the world. It is also culturally diverse and plays an important role in the United Nations and the European politics.

Luxembourg Weekend Video

Due to Luxembourg’s close proximity to countries like France, Germany and Belgium, you can definitely drive down to the capital city for a weekend or a day trip. 

Luxembourg City is a city that is blessed with a good economy.  Everything is in pristine condition, with a clear strategy of continual restoration being deployed. Luxembourg City is a very small city, so it’s easy to get around and to see a lot in a short space of time. For foodies, there is a plethora of gourmet food stores, chocolate stores, cafes, restaurants and pubs.

Place de la Constitution (or Constitution Square) contains a memorial dedicated to the heroes of the World War II. The square consists of manicured gardens and multiple Luxembourg flags that flutter against the backdrop of the bridges and dense forests. 

Notre Dame Cathedral is a Roman Catholic Church in Luxembourg City. This is the only cathedral in the country of Luxembourg. The cathedral is a great example of Gothic architecture intermixed with Renaissance elements. The church has 3 towers – Jesuit church, bell tower and the third tower stands over the transept.

The Fish Market, another famous spot and worth visiting was originally supposed to be the historical center of the Old Town. The markets here were established at the forecourt of the castles of the Dukes. This area was lined with businesses, including an old market – called the cheese market.

The Place d’Armes is a square in the old town, which attracts a large number of locals and visitors. Place d’Armes originally served as a parade ground for troops defending the city. Today it pulls visitors during summers, and during winters there are Christmas markets and holiday celebrations at the square. The square is surrounded by numerous cafés and restaurants, so a perfect place for lunch. Specialty restaurants are a tad pricier than Belgium. There are fast food and food stall options available at the square as well (budget eating).

One of the highlights of my Luxembourg itinerary was visiting the Grund. The Grund is a historic quarter located in the lower part of Luxembourg city. There are many things to see and explore at the Grund. I definitely recommend taking a walking tour here.

I found it quite peculiar that there were so many Chinese living and settled in Luxembourg, including the culinary scenes that gave full proof of this. This speaks volumes about their trade relations with the country. Apart from this there is German, French and Belgian influence which is clearly seen and evident in their language and culture.

The most interesting thing about Luxembourg City is the layout of the town itself. It sort of spills over into a ravine. Other than that… clean, pleasant, probably an enjoyable place to live.

If you have the time and transportation, it is definitely worth a visit, Luxembourg is a beautiful and historic country. Fortress Luxembourg has been central to Western European history north of the Alps since Roman times. Within a few miles of its borders, you will find the old Roman city of Trier and the birthplace of France at the Reims Cathedral, as well as Aachen, where Charlemagne ruled the Holy Roman Empire.

Luxembourg-city is linked to all national cities by an excellent public transport network. The bus/train combination tickets are valid throughout the country.A day ticket costs 4€ and is valid for an unlimited number of trips from validation until 4 a.m. the next day. A short-term ticket costs 2€ and is valid for two hours. Public transport is free of charge from March 2020 onwards for all people who visit Luxembourg.

Amongst some moments that seized the day was also a fair visit to the local fair and festival similar to the Oktoberfest in Germany but not so grand and lavish that managed to keep up the spirits with its beer and burgers. I actually liked the food that I had at the fest. Some rides were thrilling while some just took you back to your childhood.

We got an amazing Airbnb for grabs with a luxurious floor heating feature and so many freebies that I could not contain my happiness. It was the best studio I had ever booked and worth every penny. Check out the video review below to know more! Click on the link and please do not forget to subscribe to my channel.Airbnb Luxembourg Review


Some do’s and dont’s in Luxembourg

DO make an effort to get to know something about the country and learn some Luxembourgish words.

DO avoid asking personal questions.  Be direct but always show diplomacy and a sense of sensitivity.

Luxembourgers are regarded as friendly and courteous but they tend to favour formality and reserve over directness and extraverted behaviours.

Private matters are never discussed with friends no matter how close the friend.

Chrysanthemum is a very serious flower in Luxembourg and used only for serious occasions.

I did enjoy seeing Luxembourg but it was Luxembourg City that I actually saw. It is quite expensive compared to some other cities, even Paris to me. It is nice to see at least one time, but unless I am in that area again, or going through that area, I really wouldn’t stop again. 

I kept this blog crisp, and very clear as Luxembourg was not a country that practically wooed me away. It is different in its own way for its elegance but definitely not my type!

Until next time with Poland.
This is the 2019 travel series.

Signing off
Rucha S Khot

One Comment Add yours

  1. Ann says:

    Wow I would really like to visit Luxembourg on day!

    Liked by 1 person

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